Always Going Away

A blog about traveling. for a day, a month, a year, or forever.

Posts tagged Europe

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This is Melpignano.

A small village in Salento, Puglia (southern Italy, of course).

It was August 2010 and everywhere else in Salento was very crowded.

But there, just because it is some kilometres from the seaside, there was absolutely nobody during the day.

And we had the occasion to meet some very friendly, and very old, locals in the central piazza you can see (a part) above.

A very nice day.

Filed under Puglia Salento Italy Europe drawing

5 notes

Urbino
This is the Ducal Palace of Urbino, an absolutely astonishing place - and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The little city is a must-see if you are visiting central Italy.
I, personally, love it.

Urbino

This is the Ducal Palace of Urbino, an absolutely astonishing place - and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The little city is a must-see if you are visiting central Italy.

I, personally, love it.

Filed under Europe Italy photo Marche

3 notes

Some words need to be spent on these London riots.
I lived in London some years ago (by the way in Brixton), my girlfriend is living there right now and I’m planning to be back myself very soon. So, as you see, “this time is personal”.
Actually not a thousand pages would be enough to explain what’s happening and what my thoughts are - and many writers/bloggers/journalists have already written much better about it than I could ever do.
This time is not that easy as in the recent Oslo events. There is not a clearly visible right and wrong side; there is not a single person going mad or misinterpreting social situations. There is an entire generation and an entire social class going wild against everything and everyone.
As I said not a thousand pages would be enough to try to explain everything, so I just ask you some question.
A single person can go mad without any external responsibility; can thousands people do that at the same time?
Do we have to condemn all these looters assaulting private shops, attacking private people and even breaking in private houses? Hell yes!. Do we have to consider the all thing like a sad, isolated episode to be dealt by the police and move on? (“oh God, no!” it’s my call, if you ask me).
Do you really believe the umpteenth episode where a black guy get out dead from an encounter with the cops can cause all of that? I don’t know maybe more the sum of them?
And who’s the fault if these guys (and girls, and men, and women, let’s say that) instead of marching against the police of the palaces of power (the responsible of Duggan’s death, right?), have just tried to loot the most out of the situation stealing cell-phones, plasma TVs, branded clothes and so on?
Everyone was supporting the revolts in Tunisia, Egypt, (now in Syria)… How’s that different just because it’s happening near our homes menacing our precious stuff?
Well, even the questions are so many they can’t fit in this blog.
I have my answers, what are yours?
(I know the purpose of the blog is supposed to be slightly different, but I think, somehow, this talks about a world problem that everyone should be dealing with if interested in keeping traveling.)

Some words need to be spent on these London riots.

I lived in London some years ago (by the way in Brixton), my girlfriend is living there right now and I’m planning to be back myself very soon. So, as you see, “this time is personal”.

Actually not a thousand pages would be enough to explain what’s happening and what my thoughts are - and many writers/bloggers/journalists have already written much better about it than I could ever do.

This time is not that easy as in the recent Oslo events. There is not a clearly visible right and wrong side; there is not a single person going mad or misinterpreting social situations. There is an entire generation and an entire social class going wild against everything and everyone.

As I said not a thousand pages would be enough to try to explain everything, so I just ask you some question.

A single person can go mad without any external responsibility; can thousands people do that at the same time?

Do we have to condemn all these looters assaulting private shops, attacking private people and even breaking in private houses? Hell yes!. Do we have to consider the all thing like a sad, isolated episode to be dealt by the police and move on? (“oh God, no!” it’s my call, if you ask me).

Do you really believe the umpteenth episode where a black guy get out dead from an encounter with the cops can cause all of that? I don’t know maybe more the sum of them?

And who’s the fault if these guys (and girls, and men, and women, let’s say that) instead of marching against the police of the palaces of power (the responsible of Duggan’s death, right?), have just tried to loot the most out of the situation stealing cell-phones, plasma TVs, branded clothes and so on?

Everyone was supporting the revolts in Tunisia, Egypt, (now in Syria)… How’s that different just because it’s happening near our homes menacing our precious stuff?

Well, even the questions are so many they can’t fit in this blog.

I have my answers, what are yours?

(I know the purpose of the blog is supposed to be slightly different, but I think, somehow, this talks about a world problem that everyone should be dealing with if interested in keeping traveling.)

Filed under Europe London UK Banksy art text riots

6 notes

Porto Badisco

They say Aeneas, the legendary progenitor of Rome kings, landed firstly in Italy at this narrow long bay on his way from the burning Troy in search for a new home.
Now Puglia, and especially Salento, is one the most amazing places of Italy where to spend your summertime.
Stunning sea and beaches, wonderful cities and villages and plenty of gigs all summer long.
Maybe, lately, some places are becoming too crowded, especially in august, but, if you don’t like it, you will always be able to find a quiet, peaceful spot to rest just few kilometres away from the packed beaches.
(And I’ll show you soon how quiet these villages can be).

Porto Badisco

They say Aeneas, the legendary progenitor of Rome kings, landed firstly in Italy at this narrow long bay on his way from the burning Troy in search for a new home.

Now Puglia, and especially Salento, is one the most amazing places of Italy where to spend your summertime.

Stunning sea and beaches, wonderful cities and villages and plenty of gigs all summer long.

Maybe, lately, some places are becoming too crowded, especially in august, but, if you don’t like it, you will always be able to find a quiet, peaceful spot to rest just few kilometres away from the packed beaches.

(And I’ll show you soon how quiet these villages can be).

Filed under Puglia Salento Italy Europe photo text

11 notes

Tropea

This is Calabria, the instep of Italy’s boot and one of its most beautiful and unknown region.
Sadly the 'ndrangheta (local powerful mafia) is keeping away most of the tourists.
It’s not that it is really dangerous to walk through it for the common tourist (even if in that same beach a week after this photo was taken a man was shot dead by a mafia professional killer), it’s more that, due to the 'ndrangheta's reign of terror, the land is missing every kind of facilities and promotion and it is mentioned in the news just when some local politician or judge is murdered by the mafia, creating around it a very bad reputation.
Tropea is one of few places in this land to be quite touristic. The beach seems to be quite crowded but it’s nothing compared to the near beaches of Puglia. (Plus this picture was taken in mid-August that is supposed to be the most crowded period for Italy’s tourism).
Most of the people you see are locals or Calabrian emigrants back to their land to visit for the summertime. (Calabrians during the last century have emigrated away to northern Italy and to the rest of the world, so when you walk through a crowd you can even hear many accents and many languages, but very few of them are real tourists).
(If you’re asking, I don’t have any Calabrian origin, but I was there with and thanks to a friend whose parents were born and raised there before emigrating to northern Italy - and that’s another common way to visit the region.)

Tropea

This is Calabria, the instep of Italy’s boot and one of its most beautiful and unknown region.

Sadly the 'ndrangheta (local powerful mafia) is keeping away most of the tourists.

It’s not that it is really dangerous to walk through it for the common tourist (even if in that same beach a week after this photo was taken a man was shot dead by a mafia professional killer), it’s more that, due to the 'ndrangheta's reign of terror, the land is missing every kind of facilities and promotion and it is mentioned in the news just when some local politician or judge is murdered by the mafia, creating around it a very bad reputation.

Tropea is one of few places in this land to be quite touristic. The beach seems to be quite crowded but it’s nothing compared to the near beaches of Puglia. (Plus this picture was taken in mid-August that is supposed to be the most crowded period for Italy’s tourism).

Most of the people you see are locals or Calabrian emigrants back to their land to visit for the summertime. (Calabrians during the last century have emigrated away to northern Italy and to the rest of the world, so when you walk through a crowd you can even hear many accents and many languages, but very few of them are real tourists).

(If you’re asking, I don’t have any Calabrian origin, but I was there with and thanks to a friend whose parents were born and raised there before emigrating to northern Italy - and that’s another common way to visit the region.)

Filed under Calabria Italy Europe photo seaside text

5 notes

Bagno Vignoni
Another wonderful Italian village.
Think about literally ten houses, four restaurants, three hotels and a couple of bars built around this stunning square/basin filled with thermal water.
And all of that on top of a hill with a wonderful view and with thermal ponds at its foot.
This is Tuscany, this is Italy.

Bagno Vignoni

Another wonderful Italian village.

Think about literally ten houses, four restaurants, three hotels and a couple of bars built around this stunning square/basin filled with thermal water.

And all of that on top of a hill with a wonderful view and with thermal ponds at its foot.

This is Tuscany, this is Italy.

Filed under Italy Tuscany Europe photo